1. On Authorship and Style

    There are, first of all, two kinds of authors: those who write for the subject’s sake, and those who write for writing’s sake. The first kind have had thoughts or experiences which seem to them worth communicating, while the second kind need money and consequently write for money. They think in order to write, and they may be recognised by their spinning out their thoughts to the greatest possible length, and also by the way they work out their thoughts, which are half-true, perverse, forced, and vacillating; then also by their love of evasion, so that they may seem what they are not; and this is why their writing is lacking in definiteness and clearness.

    - Arthur Schopenhauer, ‘On Authorship and Style’ (1851) in Essays of Schopenhauer, translated by Mrs Rudolf Dircks [full text]

     
  2. In society they not only disliked asserting themselves, but were actually retiring. Certainly no one could blame them for being too arrogant or haughty, and yet everybody was well aware that they were proud and quite understood their own value. The eldest was musical, while the second was a clever artist, which fact she had concealed until lately. In a word, the world spoke well of the girls; but they were not without their enemies, and occasionally people talked with horror of the number of books they had read.

    - Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Idiot (1869) translated by Eva Martin [full text]

     
  3. No doubt she also belonged to the category of ordinary people who dream of being original, but she soon discovered that she had not a grain of true originality, and she did not let it trouble her too much.

    - Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Idiot (1869) translated by Eva Martin [full text]

     
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    When on the spindle, spun to endless distance, By Nature’s listless hand the thread is twirled, And the discordant tones of all existence In sullen jangle are together hurled,
- Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust (1808) translated by Bayard Taylor and illustrated by Harry Clarke [full text]

    When on the spindle, spun to endless distance,
    By Nature’s listless hand the thread is twirled,
    And the discordant tones of all existence
    In sullen jangle are together hurled,

    - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust (1808) translated by Bayard Taylor and illustrated by Harry Clarke [full text]

     
  5. Man is divided into three classes, viz., the hare man, the bull man, and the horse man, according to the size of his lingam.

    - Vatsyayana, The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana, translated from the Sanskrit by Shivaram Parashuram Bhide, Richard Francis Burton and Bhagavanlal Indrajit (1883) [full text]

     
  6. When a man kisses the upper lip of a woman, while she in return kisses his lower lip, it is called the “kiss of the upper lip.”

    When one of them takes both the lips of the other between his or her own, it is called “a clasping kiss.” A woman, however, only takes this kind of kiss from a man who has no moustache.

    - Vatsyayana, The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana, translated from the Sanskrit by Shivaram Parashuram Bhide, Richard Francis Burton and Bhagavanlal Indrajit (1883) [full text]

     
  7. The following are the places for kissing, viz., the forehead, the eyes, the cheeks, the throat, the bosom, the breasts, the lips, and the interior of the mouth.

    - Vatsyayana, The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana, translated from the Sanskrit by Shivaram Parashuram Bhide, Richard Francis Burton and Bhagavanlal Indrajit (1883) [full text]

     
  8. Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.

    - Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina (1877) translated by Constance Garnett [full text]

     
  9. She was not like a girl at her first ball, for whom all faces in the ballroom melt into one vision of fairyland. And she was not a girl who had gone the stale round of balls till every face in the ballroom was familiar and tiresome. But she was in the middle stage between these two; she was excited, and at the same time she had sufficient self-possession to be able to observe.

    - Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina (1877) translated by Constance Garnett [full text]