1. Propos. I:
It seems not absurd to conceive that at the first Production of mixt Bodies, the Universal Matter whereof they among other Parts of the Universe consisted, was actually divided into little Particles of several sizes and shapes variously mov’d.
This (sayes Carneades) I suppose you will easily enough allow. For besides that which happens in the Generation, Corruption, Nutrition, and wasting of Bodies, that which we discover partly by our Microscopes of the extream littlenesse of even the scarce sensible parts of Concretes; and partly by the Chymical Resolutions of mixt Bodies, and by divers other Operations of Spagyrical Fires upon them, seems sufficiently to manifest their consisting of parts very minute and of differing Figures. And that there does also intervene a various local Motion of such small Bodies, will scarce be denied; whether we chuse to grant the Origine of Concretions assign’d by Epicurus, or that related by Moses.
- Robert Boyle, The Sceptical Chymist: or, Chymico-Physical Doubts & Paradoxes (1661) [full text]

    Propos. I:

    It seems not absurd to conceive that at the first Production of mixt Bodies, the Universal Matter whereof they among other Parts of the Universe consisted, was actually divided into little Particles of several sizes and shapes variously mov’d.

    This (sayes Carneades) I suppose you will easily enough allow. For besides that which happens in the Generation, Corruption, Nutrition, and wasting of Bodies, that which we discover partly by our Microscopes of the extream littlenesse of even the scarce sensible parts of Concretes; and partly by the Chymical Resolutions of mixt Bodies, and by divers other Operations of Spagyrical Fires upon them, seems sufficiently to manifest their consisting of parts very minute and of differing Figures. And that there does also intervene a various local Motion of such small Bodies, will scarce be denied; whether we chuse to grant the Origine of Concretions assign’d by Epicurus, or that related by Moses.

    - Robert Boyle, The Sceptical Chymist: or, Chymico-Physical Doubts & Paradoxes (1661) [full text]

     
  2. Wherever animals or vegetables are crowded, disease appears. This is true of molluscs, and it is seldom worth while looking for a specimen fit for a collection where any particular kind of shellfish lives in great numbers. Animal and vegetable parasites will be found wherever shellfish are crowded together. For instance, a perfect cockle, or one good enough for a collection, will not be found on a cockle bank, but solitary ones must be looked for elsewhere.
- E.G.B. Moss, The Beautiful Shells of New Zealand (1908) [full text]

    Wherever animals or vegetables are crowded, disease appears. This is true of molluscs, and it is seldom worth while looking for a specimen fit for a collection where any particular kind of shellfish lives in great numbers. Animal and vegetable parasites will be found wherever shellfish are crowded together. For instance, a perfect cockle, or one good enough for a collection, will not be found on a cockle bank, but solitary ones must be looked for elsewhere.

    - E.G.B. Moss, The Beautiful Shells of New Zealand (1908) [full text]

     
  3. I have blown a bubble on the end of a wide pipe; on holding the open end of the pipe to a candle flame, the outrushing air blows out the flame at once, which shows that the soap-bubble is acting like an elastic bag (Fig. 21). You now see that, owing to the elastic skin of a soap-bubble, the air inside is under pressure and will get out if it can. Which would you think would squeeze the air inside it most, a large or a small bubble?
- C.V. Boys, Soap-Bubbles and the Forces which Mould Them (1896) [full text]

    I have blown a bubble on the end of a wide pipe; on holding the open end of the pipe to a candle flame, the outrushing air blows out the flame at once, which shows that the soap-bubble is acting like an elastic bag (Fig. 21). You now see that, owing to the elastic skin of a soap-bubble, the air inside is under pressure and will get out if it can. Which would you think would squeeze the air inside it most, a large or a small bubble?

    - C.V. Boys, Soap-Bubbles and the Forces which Mould Them (1896) [full text]

     
  4. But the hardships and responsibilities by no means end with the building of the Light-house; the keeper who has it in charge holds a most important position, for upon the skill of his hands in the management of the delicate costly lenses and machinery, the clearness of his head, and the courage of his heart, as well as his honesty and fidelity, depends, even more than upon the captain of a vessel, the safety of many precious lives and millions of property; so it is of the first importance that he be intelligent, efficient and trustworthy.
- Anon, ‘Something about Light-Houses’ in Illustrated Science for Boys and Girls (1881) [full text]

    But the hardships and responsibilities by no means end with the building of the Light-house; the keeper who has it in charge holds a most important position, for upon the skill of his hands in the management of the delicate costly lenses and machinery, the clearness of his head, and the courage of his heart, as well as his honesty and fidelity, depends, even more than upon the captain of a vessel, the safety of many precious lives and millions of property; so it is of the first importance that he be intelligent, efficient and trustworthy.

    - Anon, ‘Something about Light-Houses’ in Illustrated Science for Boys and Girls (1881) [full text]