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    A remarkable feature of the last twelve months has been the recrudescence of the dirigible, which is now in far greater esteem than it was a year ago, or for that matter, ever before. In the past there is no doubt that progress was hampered by arguments between the advocates of “heavier than air” and “lighter than air,” and a curious notion that the one could only exist at the expense of the other.
- Fred T. Jane (ed.), All The World’s Aircraft (1913) [full text]

    A remarkable feature of the last twelve months has been the recrudescence of the dirigible, which is now in far greater esteem than it was a year ago, or for that matter, ever before. In the past there is no doubt that progress was hampered by arguments between the advocates of “heavier than air” and “lighter than air,” and a curious notion that the one could only exist at the expense of the other.

    - Fred T. Jane (ed.), All The World’s Aircraft (1913) [full text]

     
  2. Mr. Parker winked at his daughter and paid her tribute. “Penny has built up quite a reputation for herself as an amateur Sherlock Holmes. Running down gangsters is her specialty.”
“Dad, you egg!” Penny said indignantly.
- Mildred A. Wirt, Guilt of the Brass Thieves (1945) [full text]

    Mr. Parker winked at his daughter and paid her tribute. “Penny has built up quite a reputation for herself as an amateur Sherlock Holmes. Running down gangsters is her specialty.”

    “Dad, you egg!” Penny said indignantly.

    - Mildred A. Wirt, Guilt of the Brass Thieves (1945) [full text]

     
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    To-day everything is completely changed and except as a war machine the aeroplane is of little interest or use to anyone.
- Fred T. Jane (ed.), All The World’s Aircraft (1913) [full text]

    To-day everything is completely changed and except as a war machine the aeroplane is of little interest or use to anyone.

    - Fred T. Jane (ed.), All The World’s Aircraft (1913) [full text]

     
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    The stump of a pipe he held tight in his teeth,And the smoke it encircled his head like a wreath;He had a broad face and a little round belly,That shook when he laughed, like a bowlful of jelly.
- Clement C. Moore, A Visit from St. Nicholas (1823) illustrated by Jessie Willcox Smith [full text]

    The stump of a pipe he held tight in his teeth,
    And the smoke it encircled his head like a wreath;
    He had a broad face and a little round belly,
    That shook when he laughed, like a bowlful of jelly.

    - Clement C. Moore, A Visit from St. Nicholas (1823) illustrated by Jessie Willcox Smith [full text]

     
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    One elbow rested on the table; her chin in the cup of her hand. Her head was turned away a little so that one could see only the knot of bronze hair, the curve of a cheek, and the sweep of an eyelash.
- Kate Douglas Wiggin, The Romance of a Christmas Card (1915) [full text]

    One elbow rested on the table; her chin in the cup of her hand. Her head was turned away a little so that one could see only the knot of bronze hair, the curve of a cheek, and the sweep of an eyelash.

    - Kate Douglas Wiggin, The Romance of a Christmas Card (1915) [full text]

     
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“You don’t believe in me,” observed the Ghost.
“I don’t,” said Scrooge.
“What evidence would you have of my reality beyond that of your senses?”
“I don’t know,” said Scrooge.
“Why do you doubt your senses?”
“Because,” said Scrooge, “a little thing affects them. A slight disorder of the stomach makes them cheats. You may be an undigested bit of beef, a blot of mustard, a crumb of cheese, a fragment of an underdone potato. There’s more of gravy than of grave about you, whatever you are!”
- Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol (1843) illustrated by John Leech [full text]


    “You don’t believe in me,” observed the Ghost.

    “I don’t,” said Scrooge.

    “What evidence would you have of my reality beyond that of your senses?”

    “I don’t know,” said Scrooge.

    “Why do you doubt your senses?”

    “Because,” said Scrooge, “a little thing affects them. A slight disorder of the stomach makes them cheats. You may be an undigested bit of beef, a blot of mustard, a crumb of cheese, a fragment of an underdone potato. There’s more of gravy than of grave about you, whatever you are!”


    - Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol (1843) illustrated by John Leech [full text]
     
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    He looked up, and just fornent him there sat on his haunches a comely-looking greyhound. 
'God save you,' said Paddy, every hair in his head standing up as straight as a sally twig.
'Save you kindly,' answered the greyhound—leaving out God, the beast, bekase he was the divil.
- W.B. Yeats (ed.), Irish Fairy Tales (1892) illustrated by Jack B. Yeats [full text]

    He looked up, and just fornent him there sat on his haunches a comely-looking greyhound. 

    'God save you,' said Paddy, every hair in his head standing up as straight as a sally twig.

    'Save you kindly,' answered the greyhound—leaving out God, the beast, bekase he was the divil.

    - W.B. Yeats (ed.), Irish Fairy Tales (1892) illustrated by Jack B. Yeats [full text]

     
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    The buildings of Portugal, with one or two exceptions, cannot be said to excel or even to come up to those of other countries. To a large extent the churches are without the splendid furniture which makes those of Spain the most romantic in the world, nor are they in themselves so large or so beautiful. Some apology, then, may seem wanted for imposing on the public a book whose subject-matter is not of first-class importance.
- Walter Crum Watson, Portuguese Architecture (1908) [full text]

    The buildings of Portugal, with one or two exceptions, cannot be said to excel or even to come up to those of other countries. To a large extent the churches are without the splendid furniture which makes those of Spain the most romantic in the world, nor are they in themselves so large or so beautiful. Some apology, then, may seem wanted for imposing on the public a book whose subject-matter is not of first-class importance.

    - Walter Crum Watson, Portuguese Architecture (1908) [full text]

     
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    Whether the diseased parotid gland itself or a lymphatic body lying in connexion with it, be the subject of operation, it seldom happens that the temporo-maxillary branch of the external carotid, F, escapes the knife.
- Joseph Maclise, Surgical Anatomy (1857) [full text]

    Whether the diseased parotid gland itself or a lymphatic body lying in connexion with it, be the subject of operation, it seldom happens that the temporo-maxillary branch of the external carotid, F, escapes the knife.

    - Joseph Maclise, Surgical Anatomy (1857) [full text]

     
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    In the human body there does not exist any such space as cavity, properly so called. Every space is occupied by its contents. The thoracic space is completely filled by its viscera, which, in mass, take a perfect cast or model of its interior. The thoracic viscera lie so closely to one another, that they respectively influence the form and dimensions of each other.
- Joseph Maclise, Surgical Anatomy (1857) [full text]

    In the human body there does not exist any such space as cavity, properly so called. Every space is occupied by its contents. The thoracic space is completely filled by its viscera, which, in mass, take a perfect cast or model of its interior. The thoracic viscera lie so closely to one another, that they respectively influence the form and dimensions of each other.

    - Joseph Maclise, Surgical Anatomy (1857) [full text]

     
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    There, squatting oddly enough on the pavement-curb of a street opposite the lawns, sat a frowsy, gaberdined Jew. Vividly set between the tiny green cockle-shell hat on his head and the long uncombed black beard was the face of my desire. The head was bowed towards the earth; it did not even turn towards the gay crowd, as if the mere spectacle was beadle-barred.
- Israel Zangwill, ‘The Model of Sorrows’ in Ghetto Comedies (1907) illustrated by J.H. Amschewitz [full text]

    There, squatting oddly enough on the pavement-curb of a street opposite the lawns, sat a frowsy, gaberdined Jew. Vividly set between the tiny green cockle-shell hat on his head and the long uncombed black beard was the face of my desire. The head was bowed towards the earth; it did not even turn towards the gay crowd, as if the mere spectacle was beadle-barred.

    - Israel Zangwill, ‘The Model of Sorrows’ in Ghetto Comedies (1907) illustrated by J.H. Amschewitz [full text]

     
  12. The Comfortable Confidential Cow, who sate in her Red Morocco Arm Chair and toasted her own Bread at the parlour Fire.
- Edward Lear, ‘Twenty-Six Nonsense Rhymes and Pictures’ in More Nonsense (1872) [full text]

    The Comfortable Confidential Cow,
    who sate in her Red Morocco Arm Chair and
    toasted her own Bread at the parlour Fire.

    - Edward Lear, ‘Twenty-Six Nonsense Rhymes and Pictures’ in More Nonsense (1872) [full text]

     
  13. The Scroobious Snake, who always wore a Hat on his Head, for fear he should bite anybody.
- Edward Lear, ‘Twenty-Six Nonsense Rhymes and Pictures’ in More Nonsense (1872) [full text]

    The Scroobious Snake,
    who always wore a Hat on his Head, for
    fear he should bite anybody.

    - Edward Lear, ‘Twenty-Six Nonsense Rhymes and Pictures’ in More Nonsense (1872) [full text]

     
  14. She strove the neighbourhood to please With manners wondrous winning; And never follow’d wicked ways—
Unless when she was sinning.
- Oliver Goldsmith, An Elegy on the Glory of her Sex: Mrs Mary Blaize (1885) [full text]

    She strove the neighbourhood to please
    With manners wondrous winning;
    And never follow’d wicked ways—

    Unless when she was sinning.

    - Oliver Goldsmith, An Elegy on the Glory of her Sex: Mrs Mary Blaize (1885) [full text]

     
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    Windy Nights
Whenever the moon and stars are set, Whenever the wind is high, All night long in the dark and wet, A man goes riding by. Late in the night when the fires are out,Why does he gallop and gallop about? Whenever the trees are crying aloud, And ships are tossed at sea, By, on the highway, low and loud, By at the gallop goes he. By at the gallop he goes, and then By he comes back at the gallop again.
- Robert Louis Stevenson, A Child’s Garden of Verses (1885) illustrated by Myrtle Sheldon [full text]

    Windy Nights

    Whenever the moon and stars are set,
    Whenever the wind is high,
    All night long in the dark and wet,
    A man goes riding by.
    Late in the night when the fires are out,
    Why does he gallop and gallop about?
    Whenever the trees are crying aloud,
    And ships are tossed at sea,
    By, on the highway, low and loud,
    By at the gallop goes he.
    By at the gallop he goes, and then
    By he comes back at the gallop again.

    - Robert Louis Stevenson, A Child’s Garden of Verses (1885) illustrated by Myrtle Sheldon [full text]