1.  Altogether a woman that might have been described as “jolly good-looking,” if it had not been that whenever any man looked at her something hostile and forbidding came into the countenance, and the eyebrows formed an angry bar of hazel-brown above the dark-lashed eyes. But her “young man” look won for her many a feminine friendship which she impatiently repelled; for sentimentality disgusted her.

    - Sir Harry Hamilton Johnston, Mrs. Warren’s Daughter: A Story of the Woman’s Movement (1920)[full text]

     
  2. What precise purpose this ivory horn or lance answers, it would be hard to say. […] My own opinion is that however this one-sided horn may really be used by the Narwhale—however that may be—it would certainly be very convenient to him for a folder in reading pamphlets.

    - Herman Melville, Moby Dick (1851) [full text]

     
  3. The end of a novel, like the end of a children’s dinner party, must be made up of sweetmeats and sugar-plums.

    - Anthony Trollope, Barchester Towers (1857) [full text]

     
  4. In a few days more an anonymous green parrot arrived, in a gilt cage, with a little note in a clerk’s hand, addressed to ‘Miss Ruthyn (of Knowl), Bartram-Haugh,’ &c. It contained only ‘Directions for caring green parrot,’ at the close of which, underlined, the words appeared—’The bird’s name is Maud.’

    - J.S. LeFanu, Uncle Silas (1899) [full text]

     
  5. The midnight sun had set, but in a crotch between two snow-peaks it had kindled a vast caldron from which rose a mist of jewels, garnet and turquoise, topaz and amethyst and opal, all swimming in a sea of molten gold. The glow of it still clung to the face of the broad Yukon, as a flush does to the soft, wrinkled cheek of a girl just roused from deep sleep.
- William McLeod Raine, The Yukon Trail (1917) illustrated by George Ellis Wolfe. [full text]

    The midnight sun had set, but in a crotch between two snow-peaks it had kindled a vast caldron from which rose a mist of jewels, garnet and turquoise, topaz and amethyst and opal, all swimming in a sea of molten gold. The glow of it still clung to the face of the broad Yukon, as a flush does to the soft, wrinkled cheek of a girl just roused from deep sleep.

    - William McLeod Raine, The Yukon Trail (1917) illustrated by George Ellis Wolfe. [full text]

     
  6. "No, we haven’t any great men," Denham replied. "I’m very glad that we haven’t. I hate great men. The worship of greatness in the nineteenth century seems to me to explain the worthlessness of that generation."

    - Virginia Woolf, Night and Day (1919) [full text]

     
  7. She was a curious woman, whose dresses always looked as if they had been designed in a rage and put on in a tempest. She was usually in love with somebody, and, as her passion was never returned, she had kept all her illusions. She tried to look picturesque, but only succeeded in being untidy. Her name was Victoria, and she had a perfect mania for going to church.

    - Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891) [full text]

     
  8. At the bottom of his heart Colonel Musgrave was a trifle irritated that his self-sacrifice should be thus unrewarded by martyrdom.

    James Branch Cabell, The Rivet in Grandfather’s Neck: A Comedy of Limitations (1915) [full text]

     
  9. 17:53

    notes: 5

    tags: fictioneliot1876

    There had sprung up in him a meditative yearning after wide knowledge which is likely always to abate ardour in the fight for prize acquirement in narrow tracks.

    - George Eliot, Daniel Deronda (1876) [full text]

     
  10. He opened the lid and picked out the hand.

    "Cold?" asked Eustace.

    "Tepid. A bit below blood-heat by the feel. Soft and supple too. If it’s the embalming, it’s a sort of embalming I’ve never seen before. Is it your uncle’s hand?"

    "Oh, yes, it’s his all right," said Eustace. "I should know those long thin fingers anywhere. Put it back in the box, Saunders. Never mind about the screws."

    - W.F. Harvey, ‘The Beast with Five Fingers’ (1919) in Famous Modern Ghost Stories [full text]

     
  11. "I’ve always imagined that my name was Cordelia—at least, I always have of late years. When I was young I used to imagine it was Geraldine, but I like Cordelia better now. But if you call me Anne please call me Anne spelled with an E."

    - L.M. Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables (1908) [full text]

     
  12. Until the first great disillusions of his youth, the Bedelle Foot Regulator and the Mosquito-Proof Socks, had brought a new sentimental need of consolation and understanding, Skippy Bedelle’s opinion of the feminine sex had been decidedly monastic. During the first twenty-five years of their existence, he regarded them as unmitigated nuisances, and pondering on them, he often wondered at the hidden purposes of the Creator. Later they might possibly serve some purpose by marrying and adding to the world’s supply of boys. In a further progress, a sort of penitential progress, they became more valuable members of society, as maiden aunts who tipped you on the quiet, and grandmothers who mitigated parental severity and knew the exquisite art of ginger snaps, crisp and brown.

    - Owen Johnson, Skippy Bedelle: His Sentimental Progress from the Urchin to the Complete Man of the World (1922) [full text]

     
  13. It is observed, that the red haired of both sexes are more libidinous and mischievous than the rest, whom yet they much exceed in strength and activity.

    - Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels (1726) [full text]

     
  14. Bookshops are the most charming of all shops because they relate themselves so intimately to their visitors.
- Munson Havens, Old Valentines (1914) [full text]

    Bookshops are the most charming of all shops because they relate themselves so intimately to their visitors.

    - Munson Havens, Old Valentines (1914) [full text]

     
  15. I think she was awfully disgusted when she was back in the England of to-day not to find Mrs. Fawcett Prime Ministress and First Lady of the Treasury, Annie Kenney at the Board of Trade and Christabel Pankhurst running the Ministry of Health. It was disheartening after the long struggle for the Woman’s Vote and the equality of the sexes in opportunity to find the same old men-muddlers in charge of all public affairs and departments of state, and the only woman on the benches of the House of Commons a millionaire peeress never before identified with the struggle for the Woman’s Cause.

    - Sir Harry Hamilton Johnston, Mrs. Warren’s Daughter: A Story of the Woman’s Movement (1920) [full text]