1. The whole French nation has always lived for the present time, in actuality, deriving from life more of what may be called social pleasure than any other nation. It has been a universal characteristic among French people since the sixteenth century to love to please, to make themselves agreeable, to bring joy and happiness to others, and to be loved and admired as well.

    Hugo Paul Thieme, Women of Modern France (1907), vol XII of Women: In all ages and in all countries [full text]

     
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    "But," says Marguerite de Valois, "the nuptials took place in a few days, with triumph and magnificence that none others, of even my quality, had ever beheld. The King of Navarre and his troop changed their mourning for very rich and fine clothes, I being dressed royally, with crown and corsage of tufted ermine all blazing with crown jewels, and, the grand blue mantle with a train four ells long borne by three princesses. The people down below, in their eagerness to see us as we passed, choked one another."
Hugo Paul Thieme, Women of Modern France (1907) vol XII of Women: In all ages and in all countries [full text]

    "But," says Marguerite de Valois, "the nuptials took place in a few days, with triumph and magnificence that none others, of even my quality, had ever beheld. The King of Navarre and his troop changed their mourning for very rich and fine clothes, I being dressed royally, with crown and corsage of tufted ermine all blazing with crown jewels, and, the grand blue mantle with a train four ells long borne by three princesses. The people down below, in their eagerness to see us as we passed, choked one another."

    Hugo Paul Thieme, Women of Modern France (1907) vol XII of Women: In all ages and in all countries [full text]

     
  3. image: download

    Very large ants, magpies in every meadow, and coffee-cups without  handles, but of great girth, are some of the objects that soon become familiar to strangers who wander in that part of France which was at one time as  much part of England as any of the counties of this island.
- Gordon Home, ‘Some Features of Normandy’ (1905) in The Illustrated Works of Gordon Home [full text]

    Very large ants, magpies in every meadow, and coffee-cups without handles, but of great girth, are some of the objects that soon become familiar to strangers who wander in that part of France which was at one time as much part of England as any of the counties of this island.

    - Gordon Home, ‘Some Features of Normandy’ (1905) in The Illustrated Works of Gordon Home [full text]