1. He thought of at least three houses in the village where that very night he would have found lights and laughter and clever talk, and the prodding sympathy of earnest women who made the sternest happening of the day seem nothing more than a dress rehearsal for the evening’s narration of it.
- Eleanor Hallowell Abbott, The Sick-a-Bed Lady (1911) [full text]

    He thought of at least three houses in the village where that very night he would have found lights and laughter and clever talk, and the prodding sympathy of earnest women who made the sternest happening of the day seem nothing more than a dress rehearsal for the evening’s narration of it.

    - Eleanor Hallowell Abbott, The Sick-a-Bed Lady (1911) [full text]

     
  2. The storm and stress period of woman and the new social and psychological formations thereby entailed must, indeed, extend far into the twentieth century. This period of conflict will cease only when woman within and out of marriage shall have received legal equality with man. It will cease when such a transformation of society shall have come to pass that the present rivalry between the sexes shall be ended in a manner advantageous to both and when finally the work of earning a livelihood as well as care of the household shall have received such form that it will weigh less heavily than now upon the woman.

    - Ellen Key, ‘The Morality of Women’ in The Morality of Women and Other Essays(1911) translated from the Swedish by Mamah Bouton Borthwick [full text]

     
  3. Love is moral even without legal marriage, but marriage is immoral without love.

    - Ellen Key, ‘The Morality of Women’ in The Morality of Women and Other Essays (1911) translated from the Swedish by Mamah Bouton Borthwick [full text]

     
  4. When the day came for me to be named, mother said, “He looks like my brother Zachariah,” but father said, “He looks like my brother Simpson.” “All right”, said mother, “we will just christen him Zachariah Simpson.” And that is my name unto this day.

    - Z.S. Hastings, Autobiography of Z.S. Hastings, Written For His Boys (1911) [full text]

     
  5. ANGLO-ISRAELITE THEORY, the contention that the British people in the United Kingdom, its colonies, and the United States, are the racial descendants of the “ten tribes” forming the kingdom of Israel, large numbers of whom were deported by Sargon king of Assyria on the fall of Samaria in 721 B.C. The theory (which is fully set forth in a book called Philo-Israel) rests on premises which are deemed by scholars—both theological and anthropological—to be utterly unsound.

    - Various, The Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Vol. 2 (1910-11) [full text]

     
  6. We have been so taken up with the phenomena of masculinity and femininity, that our common humanity has largely escaped notice. We know we are human, naturally, and are very proud of it; but we do not consider in what our humanness consists; nor how men and women may fall short of it, or overstep its bounds, in continual insistence upon their special differences. It is “manly” to do this; it is “womanly” to do that; but what a human being should do under the circumstances is not thought of.

    The only time when we do recognize what we call “common humanity” is in extreme cases, matters of life and death; when either man or woman is expected to behave as if they were also human creatures. Since the range of feeling and action proper to humanity, as such, is far wider than that proper to either sex, it seems at first somewhat remarkable that we have given it so little recognition.

    - Charlotte Perkins Gilman, The Man-Made World, or, Our Androcentric Culture (1911) [full text]

     
  7. image: download

    Map V: Night Sky - April and May
Below the Little Bear we find Cepheus low down to the east of north, and Cassiopeia low down to the west of north. Perseus, the Rescuer, is setting in the northwest; the Camelopard is above, trying to get on his feet.
- Richard A. Proctor, Half-Hours With The Stars: A Plain and Easy Guide to the Knowledge of the Constellations (1911) [full text]

    Map V: Night Sky - April and May

    Below the Little Bear we find Cepheus low down to the east of north, and Cassiopeia low down to the west of north. Perseus, the Rescuer, is setting in the northwest; the Camelopard is above, trying to get on his feet.

    - Richard A. Proctor, Half-Hours With The Stars: A Plain and Easy Guide to the Knowledge of the Constellations (1911) [full text]

     
  8. Peter was not quite like other boys; but he was afraid at last. A tremour ran through him, like a shudder passing over the sea; but on the sea one shudder follows another till there are hundreds of them, and Peter felt just the one. Next moment he was standing erect on the rock again, with that smile on his face and a drum beating within him. It was saying, “To die will be an awfully big adventure.”

    - J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan (1911) [full text]

     
  9. 12:58

    notes: 15

    tags: Barrie1911children's

    Of course the Neverlands vary a good deal. John’s, for instance, had a lagoon with flamingoes flying over it at which John was shooting, while Michael, who was very small, had a flamingo with lagoons flying over it.

    - J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan (1911) [full text]

     
  10. 12:03

    notes: 11

    tags: BarrieChildren's1911

    She started up with a cry, and saw the boy, and somehow she knew at once that he was Peter Pan. If you or I or Wendy had been there we should have seen that he was very like Mrs. Darling’s kiss. He was a lovely boy, clad in skeleton leaves and the juices that ooze out of trees but the most entrancing thing about him was that he had all his first teeth. When he saw she was a grown-up, he gnashed the little pearls at her.

    - J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan (1911) [full text]