1. Let no man deceive himself; if by vulgarity we mean coarseness of speech, rowdiness of behaviour, gossip, horseplay, and some heavy drinking, vulgarity there always was wherever there was joy, wherever there was faith in the gods. Wherever you have belief you will have hilarity, wherever you have hilarity you will have some dangers. And as creed and mythology produce this gross and vigorous life, so in its turn this gross and vigorous life will always produce creed and mythology. 

    - G.K. Chesterton, ‘Christmas and the Aesthetes’ (1905) in Heretics [full text]

     
  2. In the round of our rational and mournful year one festival remains out of all those ancient gaieties that once covered the whole earth. Christmas remains to remind us of those ages, whether Pagan or Christian, when the many acted poetry instead of the few writing it.

    - G.K. Chesterton, ‘Christmas and the Aesthetes’ (1905) in Heretics [full text]

     
  3. He threw down the paper in disgust. This reform made him sick. Tenements and prisons! Why were the papers always talking about tenements and prisons? They were a great deal better than the people who lived in them deserved.
- Arthur Cheney Train, McAllister and his Double (1905) [full text]

    He threw down the paper in disgust. This reform made him sick. Tenements and prisons! Why were the papers always talking about tenements and prisons? They were a great deal better than the people who lived in them deserved.

    - Arthur Cheney Train, McAllister and his Double (1905) [full text]

     
  4. He laughed outright when he saw her, and his mother flung open the door as if she had flung open her heart.
- Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, A Chariot of Fire (1905) [full text]

    He laughed outright when he saw her, and his mother flung open the door as if she had flung open her heart.

    - Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, A Chariot of Fire (1905) [full text]

     
  5. Clodagh looked up, colouring afresh; and the young man bowed quickly and eagerly. He belonged to a type new to her, but familiar to every social Londoner: the type of young Englishman who, gifted with unusual height and fine possibilities of muscular development, saunters through life—physically and morally—exerting his energy and his strength in one direction only—the eternal, aimless, enervating search after personal pleasure.

    To be explicit, the Honourable Valentine Serracauld was suffering from that most modern of complaints—the lack of surmountable obstacles.

    - Katherine Cecil Thurston, The Gambler (1905) [full text]

     
  6. He reviewed his own calm, if somewhat lonely, manhood; his aimless delving first into one branch of learning, then into another; his gradually dawning interest in the study of archaeology—an interest that, fostered by ample leisure and ample means, had become the temperate and well-ordered passion of his life.

    - Katherine Cecil Thurston, The Gambler (1905) [full text]

     
  7. image: download

    - Edmund Candler, The Unveiling of Lhasa (1905) [full text]

    - Edmund Candler, The Unveiling of Lhasa (1905) [full text]

     
  8. A philosopher has noted that at certain periods a great many stupid people have a good deal of stupid money. This condition, describable as plethora, is succeeded by another catalogued as panic.

    - Edgar Saltus, The Perfume of Eros: A Fifth Avenue Incident (1905) [full text]

     
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    COMMENT EST MORT M. GABRIEL SYVETON? La position dans laquelle a été retrouvé le corps, reconstituée avec l’aide de Mme Syveton, devant M. Boucard, juge d’instruction, et les experts.
- L’Illustration, 14th January (1905) [full text]

    COMMENT EST MORT M. GABRIEL SYVETON?
    La position dans laquelle a été retrouvé le corps, reconstituée avec l’aide de Mme Syveton, devant M. Boucard, juge d’instruction, et les experts.

    - L’Illustration, 14th January (1905) [full text]

     
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    Very large ants, magpies in every meadow, and coffee-cups without  handles, but of great girth, are some of the objects that soon become familiar to strangers who wander in that part of France which was at one time as  much part of England as any of the counties of this island.
- Gordon Home, ‘Some Features of Normandy’ (1905) in The Illustrated Works of Gordon Home [full text]

    Very large ants, magpies in every meadow, and coffee-cups without handles, but of great girth, are some of the objects that soon become familiar to strangers who wander in that part of France which was at one time as much part of England as any of the counties of this island.

    - Gordon Home, ‘Some Features of Normandy’ (1905) in The Illustrated Works of Gordon Home [full text]

     
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    A few of you have already come to see us, and we begin to hope that one day the steamers across the Atlantic will not go out full, but come back full, until some of you find your real home is here, and say as some of us say, like Finn to the woman of enchantments—
"We would not give up our own country—Ireland—if we were to get the whole world as an estate, and the Country of the Young along with it."
- Lady Augusta Gregory, dedication from Gods and Fighting Men (1905) [full text]
[See also.]

    A few of you have already come to see us, and we begin to hope that one day the steamers across the Atlantic will not go out full, but come back full, until some of you find your real home is here, and say as some of us say, like Finn to the woman of enchantments—

    "We would not give up our own country—Ireland—if we were to get the whole world as an estate, and the Country of the Young along with it."

    - Lady Augusta Gregory, dedication from Gods and Fighting Men (1905) [full text]

    [See also.]