1. She was a Russian Princess, and had driven all the way from Finland in a sledge drawn by six reindeer. The sledge was shaped like a great golden swan, and between the swan’s wings lay the little Princess herself. Her long ermine cloak reached right down to her feet, on her head was a tiny cap of silver tissue, and she was as pale as the Snow Palace in which she had always lived.
- Oscar Wilde, ‘The Remarkable Rocket’ from The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888) illustrated by Charles Robinson [full text]

    She was a Russian Princess, and had driven all the way from Finland in a sledge drawn by six reindeer. The sledge was shaped like a great golden swan, and between the swan’s wings lay the little Princess herself. Her long ermine cloak reached right down to her feet, on her head was a tiny cap of silver tissue, and she was as pale as the Snow Palace in which she had always lived.

    - Oscar Wilde, ‘The Remarkable Rocket’ from The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888) illustrated by Charles Robinson [full text]

     
  2. If I bring her a red rose, I shall hold her in my arms, and she will lean her head upon my shoulder, and her hand will be clasped in mine. But there is no red rose in my garden, so I shall sit lonely, and she will pass me by. She will have no heed of me, and my heart will break.
- Oscar Wilde, ‘The Nightingale and the Rose’ from The Happy Prince  and  Other Tales (1888) illustrated by Charles Robinson [full text]

    If I bring her a red rose, I shall hold her in my arms, and she will lean her head upon my shoulder, and her hand will be clasped in mine. But there is no red rose in my garden, so I shall sit lonely, and she will pass me by. She will have no heed of me, and my heart will break.

    - Oscar Wilde, ‘The Nightingale and the Rose’ from The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888) illustrated by Charles Robinson [full text]

     
  3. image: download

    All seemed quiet, but a strong post of some half a score of archers lay close by the bridge on either side of the road, and, as soon as they perceived Lawless with his burthen, began to bestir themselves and set arrow to string like vigilant sentries.
- Robert Louis Stevenson, The Black Arrow: A Tale of the Two Roses (1888) illustrated by N.C. Wyeth [full text]

    All seemed quiet, but a strong post of some half a score of archers lay close by the bridge on either side of the road, and, as soon as they perceived Lawless with his burthen, began to bestir themselves and set arrow to string like vigilant sentries.

    - Robert Louis Stevenson, The Black Arrow: A Tale of the Two Roses (1888) illustrated by N.C. Wyeth [full text]

     
  4. Instead of starting in a vain pursuit, he had whipped his cross-bow from his back, bent it, and set a quarrel to the string; and now, when the others had desisted, he turned to Bennet and asked if he should shoot.
“Shoot! shoot!” cried the priest, with sanguinary violence.
“Cover him, Master Dick,” said Bennet. “Bring me him down like a ripe apple.”
- Robert Louis Stevenson, The Black Arrow: A Tale of the Two  Roses (1888) illustrated by N.C. Wyeth [full text]

    Instead of starting in a vain pursuit, he had whipped his cross-bow from his back, bent it, and set a quarrel to the string; and now, when the others had desisted, he turned to Bennet and asked if he should shoot.

    “Shoot! shoot!” cried the priest, with sanguinary violence.

    “Cover him, Master Dick,” said Bennet. “Bring me him down like a ripe apple.”

    - Robert Louis Stevenson, The Black Arrow: A Tale of the Two Roses (1888) illustrated by N.C. Wyeth [full text]

     
  5. His brain was abnormally active, both through conditions of heredity and personal incitement; and the cerebral excitation necessarily produced resulted not infrequently in violent reaction, which took the form of protracted periods of melancholy. These attacks of melancholy had begun during his early school-days, when, a remarkably bright but extremely wild boy, he had been invariably fired with ambition as examinations approached, and obliged to cram to make up for lost time.

    - by Frank Lin (aka Gertrude Franklin Horn Atherton), What Dreams May Come (1888) [full text]

     
  6. No unsophisticated girl was Cora Weston, but a woman of eight-and-twenty; an adventuress by nature and by calling, and with beauty enough, and brains enough, to make her chosen profession prosperous, if not proper.
- Lawrence L. Lynch (of the Secret Service), Madeleine Payne, The Detective’s Daughter (1888) [full text]

    No unsophisticated girl was Cora Weston, but a woman of eight-and-twenty; an adventuress by nature and by calling, and with beauty enough, and brains enough, to make her chosen profession prosperous, if not proper.

    - Lawrence L. Lynch (of the Secret Service), Madeleine Payne, The Detective’s Daughter (1888) [full text]

     
  7. So the Swallow flew over the great city, and saw the rich making merry in their beautiful houses, while the beggars were sitting at the gates. He flew into dark lanes, and saw the white faces of starving children looking out listlessly at the black streets. Under the archway of a bridge two little boys were lying in one another’s arms to try and keep themselves warm. “How hungry we are!” they said. “You must not lie here,” shouted the Watchman, and they wandered out into the rain.
- Oscar Wilde, ‘The Happy Prince’ from The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888) illustrated by Charles Robinson [full text]

    So the Swallow flew over the great city, and saw the rich making merry in their beautiful houses, while the beggars were sitting at the gates. He flew into dark lanes, and saw the white faces of starving children looking out listlessly at the black streets. Under the archway of a bridge two little boys were lying in one another’s arms to try and keep themselves warm. “How hungry we are!” they said. “You must not lie here,” shouted the Watchman, and they wandered out into the rain.

    - Oscar Wilde, ‘The Happy Prince’ from The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888) illustrated by Charles Robinson [full text]

     
  8. In another instant she stood before him, her eyes blazing with wrath, and in her hand, steadfast and surely aimed, a tiny pistol—his pistol, that he had taught her to load and aim not two short hours before!
- Lawrence L. Lynch (of the Secret Service), Madeleine Payne, The Detective’s Daughter (1888) [full text]

    In another instant she stood before him, her eyes blazing with wrath, and in her hand, steadfast and surely aimed, a tiny pistol—his pistol, that he had taught her to load and aim not two short hours before!

    - Lawrence L. Lynch (of the Secret Service), Madeleine Payne, The Detective’s Daughter (1888) [full text]